Why am I Endangered ?

  • My habitat is being destroyed for farming and housing.
  • I dig for bugs, and sometimes this can ruin farmers’ crops, they see me as a pest and will trap me for sale or kill me.
  • I’m hunted for my meat and fur – some people even think I’m an aphrodisiac!
  • Once tourists feed me, I become dependant on them and frequently go to populated areas- – This is dangerous for me.
  • I don’t know road rules, and sometimes I’m hit by cars.

About Me

Limited data is available for this species, however, we believe data such as social aspects, lifestyle and life expectancy are quite similar to the Western Mountain Coati.

  • I am half the size of the White and Brown-Nosed Coati so I am considered a dwarf Coati. My coat is thought to be smooth with olive-brown colours in my fur.
  • From nose to bottom, I can reach up to 30cm in length.
  • My tail can reach up to 30cm long.
  • I’m so rare that there are no available photos or videos of me & people mistake me with other coatis.
  • We communicate to each other through various squeaks, squeals and grunts (we sound like we’ve swallowed a chew toy)

Habitat

The Eastern Mountain Coati are primarily found in Venezuela, favouring high altitudes. Currently, there are only five confirmed locations that the Eastern Mountain Coati are found in, all being located very close to each other.

Their preferred habitat includes cloudy forests and habitats in Paramo, which generally consist of open grass or desert lands.

Diet

Similar to their relatives, Western Mountain Coati, the Eastern Mountain Coati mostly feed on a variety of insects and fruit. Including beetles, larvae, ants, crickets and millipedes.

However, they are also opportunistic feeders. Commonly known to feed on frogs and carrion beetles.

Family Life

The Mountain Coati are thought to be gregarious creatures, preferring groups and companions. They form social groups (bands), usually consisting of 6-8 female adults and both male and female adolescents. Their band sizes are smaller than the Brown and White-Nosed Coatis. Male adult Coatis are solitary and tolerated only during the mating season.

Females will leave the band and build their own nest once pregnant. The gestation period (between conception and birth) for Coatis to have their babies, known as kittens,  is 3 months.

We believe that similar to their relatives, (Western Mountain Coati) female Eastern Coatis will often have 2-7 kittens, nesting in trees, and re-join the band after the kittens are 6 weeks old. However, there is no concrete evidence to support this.

Fun Fact: Female Coatis act as a sisterhood, raising all the kittens together!

Habitat

Habitat

The Eastern Mountain Coati are primarily found in Venezuela, favouring high altitudes. Currently, there are only five confirmed locations that the Eastern Mountain Coati are found in, all being located very close to each other.

Their preferred habitat includes cloudy forests and habitats in Paramo, which generally consist of open grass or desert lands.

Diet

Diet

Similar to their relatives, Western Mountain Coati, the Eastern Mountain Coati mostly feed on a variety of insects and fruit. Including beetles, larvae, ants, crickets and millipedes.

However, they are also opportunistic feeders. Commonly known to feed on frogs and carrion beetles.

Family Life

Family Life

The Mountain Coati are thought to be gregarious creatures, preferring groups and companions. They form social groups (bands), usually consisting of 6-8 female adults and both male and female adolescents. Their band sizes are smaller than the Brown and White-Nosed Coatis. Male adult Coatis are solitary and tolerated only during the mating season.

Females will leave the band and build their own nest once pregnant. The gestation period (between conception and birth) for Coatis to have their babies, known as kittens,  is 3 months.

We believe that similar to their relatives, (Western Mountain Coati) female Eastern Coatis will often have 2-7 kittens, nesting in trees, and re-join the band after the kittens are 6 weeks old. However, there is no concrete evidence to support this.

Fun Fact: Female Coatis act as a sisterhood, raising all the kittens together!

The Types of Coatis

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Brown Nosed Coati

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White Nosed Coati

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Western Mountain Coati

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