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Why is My Population Decreasing?

  • My habitat is being destroyed for farming and housing.
  • I dig for bugs, and sometimes this can ruin farmers’ crops, they see me as a pest and will trap me for sale or kill me.
  • I’m hunted for my meat and fur – some people even think I’m an aphrodisiac!
  • I’m trapped and sold in the Exotic pet-trade
  • Once tourists feed me, I become dependant on them and frequently go to populated areas- – This is dangerous for me.
  • I don’t know road rules, and sometimes I’m hit by cars.

About Me

As my name suggests I can be identified by my brown nose. My tail consists of a striped pattern, which is why I am also known as the Ring-Tailed Coati.

  • I am the most common coatimundi to be held in captivity as a pet.
  • From nose to bottom, I can reach up to 60cm in length
  • My tail can reach up to 60cm long.
  • I typically weigh between 3-8kg.
  • My life expectancy is 7-8 years in the wild & 10-17 years in captivity.
  • We communicate to each other through various squeaks, squeals and grunts (we sound like we’ve swallowed a chew toy)

Habitat

Brown Nosed Coatis are typically found in tropical regions of South America. Ranging from Colombia and Venezuela to Uruguay, Northern parts of Argentina, and Ecuador. Additionally, they are often found on the slopes of the Andes Mountains up to 2500 metres.

Brown Nosed Coatis primarily live in forested areas. Locating themselves in green, riverine, and dry forest areas. Due to human influence, Brown Nosed Coatis tend to prefer forest edges and secondary forests.

Diet

Brown Nosed Coatis are opportunistic feeders. They will eat whatever is available, depending on the season.

They show main feeding interests to a variety of fruits, invertebrates, rodents and smaller reptiles. Including spiders, crabs, millipedes, lizards, snakes and eggs.

Fun fact: They roll tarantulas in the dirt to remove all the venomous hairs before eating them.

Family Life

Coatimundis live in groups, called bands. Once pregnant, females will leave the band and build their own nest. The gestation period (between conception and birth) for Coatis to have their babies, known as kittens,  is 3 months. Male adult Coatis are solitary and tolerated only during the mating season.

Females will often have 2-7 kittens, nesting in trees, and re-join the band after the kittens are 6 weeks old.

Fun Fact: Female Coatis act as a sisterhood, raising all the kittens together!

Habitat

Habitat

Brown Nosed Coatis are typically found in tropical regions of South America. Ranging from Colombia and Venezuela to Uruguay, Northern parts of Argentina, and Ecuador. Additionally, they are often found on the slopes of the Andes Mountains up to 2500 metres.

Brown Nosed Coatis primarily live in forested areas. Locating themselves in green, riverine, and dry forest areas. Due to human influence, Brown Nosed Coatis tend to prefer forest edges and secondary forests.

Diet

Diet

Brown Nosed Coatis are opportunistic feeders. They will eat whatever is available, depending on the season.

They show main feeding interests to a variety of fruits, invertebrates, rodents and smaller reptiles. Including spiders, crabs, millipedes, lizards, snakes and eggs.

Fun fact: They roll tarantulas in the dirt to remove all the venomous hairs before eating them.

Family Life

Family Life

Coatimundis live in groups, called bands. Once pregnant, females will leave the band and build their own nest. The gestation period (between conception and birth) for Coatis to have their babies, known as kittens,  is 3 months. Male adult Coatis are solitary and tolerated only during the mating season.

Females will often have 2-7 kittens, nesting in trees, and re-join the band after the kittens are 6 weeks old.

Fun Fact: Female Coatis act as a sisterhood, raising all the kittens together!

The Types of Coatis

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White Nosed Coati

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Eastern Mountain Coati

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Western Mountain Coati

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