Video from The Dracula Reserve, Ecuador

Why am I Near Threatened  ?

  • My habitat is being destroyed for farming and housing.
  • I dig for bugs, and sometimes this can ruin farmers’ crops, they see me as a pest and will trap me for sale or kill me.
  • I’m hunted for my meat and fur – some people even think I’m an aphrodisiac!
  • Once tourists feed me, I become dependant on them and frequently go to populated areas- – This is dangerous for me.
  • I don’t know road rules, and sometimes I’m hit by cars.

About Me

I am half the size of the White and Brown Nosed Coati and considered to be dwarf Coati. My coat colour is olive green, which is uncommon for mammals.

  • There is no published data on my lifespan, however, it is predicted to be around 13 years old in captivity.
  • From nose to bottom I can reach up to 30cm in length.
  • My tail on its own can reach 30cm.
  • We communicate to each other through various squeaks, squeals and grunts (we sound like we’ve swallowed a chew toy)

Habitat

Western Mountain Coati are known to be found in Western Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador, favouring high altitudes. They have been located in the Paramos and High Andean Forests.

They control the underground invertebrate’s population, as their diet is predominantly insectivorous.

They are occasionally active during the day, however, they prefer to avoid predators and competitors by being their most active during the night.

Diet

The Mountain Coati mostly feed on a variety of insects and fruit. Including beetles, larvae, ants, crickets and millipedes.

However, they are also opportunistic feeders. Commonly known to feed on frogs and carrion beetles.

Family Life

The Bioparque La Reserva is now the home of a number of Western Mountain Coati. Their litter sizes are 1-3 cubs and locate themselves in hanging nest boxes and ground nests made of grass.

Mountain Coati are thought to be gregarious, forming social groups (bands) that consist of 6 to 8 female adults and both female and male babies. Their band sizes are smaller than the Brown and White-Nosed Coatis. Adult males are solitary and only tolerated during the mating season. For this reason, only groups of females and their offspring have been seen in the Reserva.

Fun Fact: Female Coatis act as a sisterhood, raising all the kittens together!

Habitat

Habitat

Western Mountain Coati are known to be found in Western Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador, favouring high altitudes. They have been located in the Paramos and High Andean Forests.

They control the underground invertebrate’s population, as their diet is predominantly insectivorous.

They are occasionally active during the day, however, they prefer to avoid predators and competitors by being their most active during the night.

Diet

Diet

The Mountain Coati mostly feed on a variety of insects and fruit. Including beetles, larvae, ants, crickets and millipedes.

However, they are also opportunistic feeders. Commonly known to feed on frogs and carrion beetles.

Family Life

Family Life

The Bioparque La Reserva is now the home of a number of Western Mountain Coati. Their litter sizes are 1-3 cubs and locate themselves in hanging nest boxes and ground nests made of grass.

Mountain Coati are thought to be gregarious, forming social groups (bands) that consist of 6 to 8 female adults and both female and male babies. Their band sizes are smaller than the Brown and White-Nosed Coatis. Adult males are solitary and only tolerated during the mating season. For this reason, only groups of females and their offspring have been seen in the Reserva.

Fun Fact: Female Coatis act as a sisterhood, raising all the kittens together!

The Types of Coatis

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Brown Nosed Coati

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White Nosed Coati

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Eastern Mountain Coati

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